Women’s Diagnostic Health Package

The Woman’s body is unique and every woman needs to be confident about how she feels and her state of health. Women’s Diagnostic Health Package is a solution created by Firmcare for women to check their body for cancer and infections before they have symptoms.

Getting these screening tests regularly may find infection, breast, and cervical cancer, early, when treatment is likely to work best.

DID YOU KNOW?

1 in 3 women will be diagnosed with some form of cancer before the age of 85.

There are over 200 types of cancer that can affect women.

1 in 8 women is diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 85.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in women.

Thanks to research, the 5-year survival rate of patients with early detection is just over 90%.

There are over 100 types of HPV, and around 40 of these can be sexually transmitted. Of these, approximately 15 are thought to be cancer-causing viruses, with two types - HPV-16 and HPV-18 - being responsible for around 70% of cervical cancer cases globally.

The Pap test can find abnormal cells in the cervix which may turn into cancer. The HPV test looks for the virus (human papillomavirus) that can cause these cell changes. Pap tests also can find cervical cancer early, when the chance of being cured is very high

Known risk factors are diet, alcohol consumption and physical inactivity

Drinking alcohol raises your risk of getting six kinds of cancer. All types of alcoholic drinks are linked with cancer. The more you drink, the higher your cancer risk

In 2009, cervical cancer was the third most commonly diagnosed gynaecological cancer in the world

Known risk factors are family history and genetic susceptibility as well as obesity and physical inactivity (ovarian cancer)

Symptoms are often vague and can be similar to the symptoms of many other conditions

Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been found to be associated with several kinds of cancer: cervical, vulvar, vaginal, penile, anal, and oropharyngeal (back of the throat, including the base of the tongue and tonsils)

There are over 100 types of HPV, and around 40 of these can be sexually transmitted. Of these, approximately 15 are thought to be cancer-causing viruses, with two types - HPV-16 and HPV-18 - being responsible for around 70% of cervical cancer cases globally.

The Pap test can find abnormal cells in the cervix which may turn into cancer. The HPV test looks for the virus (human papillomavirus) that can cause these cell changes. Pap tests also can find cervical cancer early, when the chance of being cured is very high

Known risk factors are diet, alcohol consumption and physical inactivity

In the past, health professionals have referred to cervical cancer as the "silent killer." Spotting cervical cancer in its early stages can prove difficult, as early forms of the disease do not usually present symptoms

It is not until the cancer becomes invasive that symptoms occur, such as abnormal bleeding after sexual intercourse, during menopause or between periods, heavy or prolonged periods, unusual discharge and/or pain during sex

Given the absence or subtleness of early symptoms of the disease, it is a concern that some women may not realize they have it, and some may even ignore the signs or confuse them with symptoms of other conditions

There are also a range of reasons that people ignore symptoms - one major explanation is denial. Other reasons can be related to culture. For example, some cultures are very fatalistic and believe that if you have cancer, there is nothing you can do about it so there's no reason to see a doctor.

The American Cancer Society state that cervical cancer used to be the leading cause of cancer death for women in the US. But because more women are undergoing screening for the disease, the number of deaths from the condition have decreased significantly over the past 40 years

With regular checks, cervical cancer is easy to detect. Liquid based cytology or pap smears find abnormal cells on the cervix (passage way between the vagina and the uterus), which can be removed completely before they turn into cancer. The main cause of cervical cancer is human papillomavirus (HPV), a type of Sexually Transmitted Disease.

Most women will complain of recurrent infection during reproductive age, only few can confidently say they are completely free. Infections can be asymptomatic while they continue to cause diseases in the body, leading to infertility or cancer later in life.

Current recommendations from the US Preventive Services Task Force (UPSTF), which were updated in March 2012, state that women aged between 21-65 years should undergo a Pap test every 3 years.

Early diagnosis remains an important early detection strategy, particularly in low- and middle-income countries where the diseases is diagnosed in late stages and resources are very limited. There is some evidence that this strategy can produce "down staging" (increasing in proportion of breast cancers detected at an early stage) of the disease to stages that are more amenable to curative treatment (Yip et al., 2008).